Conquest

Conquest
Author: Andrea Smith
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2015-04-24
Genre: Social Science
ISBN 13: 9780822360384

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In this revolutionary text, Native American scholar and activist Andrea Smith reveals the disturbing connections between white settler colonialism, genocide, and violence against Native American women and children..

Native Americans and the Christian Right

Native Americans and the Christian Right
Author: Andrea Smith
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 404
Release: 2008-04
Genre: Religion
ISBN 13: 9780822341635

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DIVArgues that previous accounts of religious and political activism in the Native American community fail to account for the variety of positions held by this community./div.

Sex Crimes and Offenders

Sex Crimes and Offenders
Author: Mary Clifford
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 613
Release: 2022-05-02
Genre: Social Science
ISBN 13: 1538125188

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Sex Crimes and Offenders emphasizes the need to focus on individual perpetrators while also stressing the importance of looking at the offender’s social and cultural environments, as well as the social and political responses designed to hold perpetrators accountable and help support victims.

Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

Genocide of Indigenous Peoples
Author: Samuel Totten
Publsiher: Transaction Publishers
Total Pages: 307
Release: 2011-12-31
Genre: Political Science
ISBN 13: 141284455X

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An estimated 350 to 600 million indigenous people reside across the globe. Numerous governments fail to recognize its indigenous peoples living within their borders. It was not until the latter part of the twentieth century that the genocide of indigenous peoples became a major focus of human rights activists, non-governmental organizations, international development and finance institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and indigenous and other community-based organizations. Scholars and activists began paying greater attention to the struggles between Fourth World peoples and First, Second, and Third World states because of illegal actions of nation-states against indigenous peoples, indigenous groups’ passive and active resistance to top-down development, and concerns about the impacts of transnational forces including what is now known as globalization. This volume offers a clear message for genocide scholars and others concerned with crimes against humanity and genocide: much greater attention must be paid to the plight of all peoples, indigenous and otherwise, no matter how small in scale, how little-known, how "invisible" or hidden from view..

Women and Genocide

Women and Genocide
Author: Elissa Bemporad
Publsiher: Indiana University Press
Total Pages: 364
Release: 2018-04-10
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 0253033837

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Front Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Memory, Body, and Power: Women and the Study of Genocide -- 1. The Gendered Logics of Indigenous Genocide -- 2. Women and the Herero Genocide -- 3. Arshaluys Mardigian/Aurora Mardiganian: Absorption, Stardom, Exploitation, and Empowerment -- 4. "Hyphenated" Identities during the Holodomor: Women and Cannibalism -- 5. Gender: A Crucial Tool in Holocaust Research -- 6. German Women and the Holocaust in the Nazi East -- 7. No Shelter to Cry In: Romani Girls and Responsibility during the Holocaust -- 8. Birangona: Rape Survivors Bearing Witness in War and Peace in Bangladesh -- 9. Very Superstitious: Gendered Punishment in Democratic Kampuchea, 1975-1979 -- 10. Sexual Violence as a Weapon during the Guatemalan Genocide -- 11. Gender and the Military in Post-Genocide Rwanda -- 12. Narratives of Survivors of Srebrenica: How Do They Reconnect to the World? -- 13. The Plight and Fate of Females During and Following the Darfur Genocide -- 14. Grassroots Women's Participation in Addressing Conflict and Genocide: Case Studies from the Middle East North Africa Region and Latin America -- Selected Bibliography: Further Readings -- Index -- Back Cover.

State Violence and the Execution of Law

State Violence and the Execution of Law
Author: Joseph Pugliese
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 243
Release: 2013
Genre: Law
ISBN 13: 0415529743

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State Violence and the Execution of Law examines how law plays a fundamental role in enabling state violence and, specifically, torture, secret imprisonment, and killing-at-a-distance..

Reservation Politics

Reservation Politics
Author: Raymond I. Orr
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 257
Release: 2017-02-03
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 0806158727

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For American Indians, tribal politics are paramount. They determine the standards for tribal enrollment, guide negotiations with outside governments, and help set collective economic and cultural goals. But how, asks Raymond I. Orr, has history shaped the American Indian political experience? By exploring how different tribes’ politics and internal conflicts have evolved over time, Reservation Politics offers rare insight into the role of historical experience in the political lives of American Indians. To trace variations in political conflict within tribes today to their different historical experiences, Orr conducted an ethnographic analysis of three federally recognized tribes: the Isleta Pueblo in New Mexico, the Citizen Potawatomi in Oklahoma, and the Rosebud Sioux in South Dakota. His extensive interviews and research reveal that at the center of tribal politics are intratribal factions with widely different worldviews. These factions make conflicting claims about the purpose, experience, and identity of their tribe. Reservation Politics points to two types of historical experience relevant to the construction of tribes’ political and economic worldviews: historical trauma, such as ethnic cleansing or geographic removal, and the incorporation of Indian communities into the market economy. In Orr's case studies, differences in experience and interpretation gave rise to complex worldviews that in turn have shaped the beliefs and behavior at play in Indian politics. By engaging a topic often avoided in political science and American Indian studies, Reservation Politics allows us to see complex historical processes at work in contemporary American Indian life. Orr’s findings are essential to understanding why tribal governments make the choices they do..

What Does Justice Look Like?

What Does Justice Look Like?
Author: Waziyatawin
Publsiher: Living Justice Press
Total Pages: 200
Release: 2013-11
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 1937141063

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Making of the American West

Making of the American West
Author: Peter Mancall
Publsiher: ABC-CLIO
Total Pages: 372
Release: 2007
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 1851097635

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"Making of the American West" surveys the experiences of major social groups in the lands from the Mississippi to the Pacific, from the United States' penetration of the region in the early 19th century to its incorporation into national political, economic, and cultural fabric by the early 20th century. This revealing volume offers fascinating portraits of the people and institutions that drove the Western conquest (traders and trappers, ranchers and settlers, corporations, the federal government), as well as of those who resisted conquest or hoped for the emergence of a different society (Indian peoples, Latinos, Asians, wage laborers). Throughout, expert contributors continually return to the growing myth of the West and the impact of its promise of freedom and opportunity on those who sought to "Americanize" it..

Genocide Or Ethnocide, 1933-2007

Genocide Or Ethnocide, 1933-2007
Author: Bartolomé Clavero
Publsiher: Giuffrè Editore
Total Pages: 274
Release: 2008
Genre: Law
ISBN 13: 8814142777

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Rabbinic Tales of Destruction

Rabbinic Tales of Destruction
Author: Julia Watts Belser
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 281
Release: 2018
Genre: RELIGION
ISBN 13: 0190600470

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"Rabbinic Tales of Destruction examines early Jewish accounts of the Roman conquest of Jerusalem from the perspective of the wounded body and the scarred land. Amidst stories saturated with sexual violence, enslavement, forced prostitution, disability, and bodily risk, the book argues that rabbinic narrative wrestles with the brutal body costs of Roman imperial domination. It brings disability studies, feminist theory, and new materialist ecological thought to accounts of rabbinic catastrophe, revealing how rabbinic discourses of gender, sexuality, and the body are shaped in the shadow of empire. Focusing on the Babylonian Talmud's longest account of the destruction of the Second Temple, the book reveals the distinctive sex and gender politics of Bavli Gittin. While Palestinian tales frequently castigate the "wayward woman" for sexual transgressions that imperil the nation, Bavli Gittin's stories resist portraying women's sexuality as a cause of catastrophe. Rather than castigate women's beauty as the cause of sexual sin, Bavli Gittin's tales express a strikingly egalitarian discourse that laments the vulnerability of both male and female bodies before the conqueror. Bavli Gittin's body politics align with a significant theological reorientation. Bavli Gittin does not explain catastrophe as divine chastisement. Instead of imagining God as the architect of Jewish suffering, it evokes God's empathy with the subjugated Jewish body and forges a sharp critique of empire. Its critical discourse aims to pierce the power politics of Roman conquest, to protest the brutality of imperial dominance, and to make plain the scar that Roman violence leaves upon Jewish flesh"--.

The Routledge Handbook of Religion, Mass Atrocity, and Genocide

The Routledge Handbook of Religion, Mass Atrocity, and Genocide
Author: Sara E. Brown
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 506
Release: 2021-11-23
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 100047187X

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The Routledge Handbook of Religion, Mass Atrocity, and Genocide explores the many and sometimes complicated ways in which religion, faith, doctrine, and practice intersect in societies where mass atrocity and genocide occur. This volume is intended as an entry point to questions about mass atrocity and genocide that are asked by and of people of faith and is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, historical events, and heated debates in this subject area. The 39 contributions to the handbook, by a team of international contributors, span five continents and cover four millennia. Each explores the intersection of religion, faith, and mainly state-sponsored mass atrocity and genocide, and draws from a variety of disciplines. This volume is divided into six core sections: Genocide in Antiquity and Holy Wars The Genocide of Indigenous Peoples Religion and the State The Role of Religion during Genocide Post Genocide Considerations Memory Culture Within these sections central issues, historical events, debates, and problems are examined, including the Crusades; Jihad and ISIS, colonialism, the Holocaust, desecration of ritual objects, politics of religion, Shinto nationalism, attacks on Rohingya Muslims; the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, responses to genocide; gender-based atrocities, ritualcide in Cambodia, burial sites and mass graves, transitional justice, forgiveness, documenting genocide, survivor memory narratives, post-conflict healing and memorialization. The Routledge Handbook of Religion and Genocide is essential reading for students and researchers with an interest in religion and genocide, religion and violence, and religion and politics. It will be of great interest to students of theology, philosophy, genocide studies, narrative studies, history, and international relations and those in related fields, such as cultural studies, area studies, sociology, and anthropology..

Native Americans, The Mainline Church, and the Quest for Interracial Justice

Native Americans, The Mainline Church, and the Quest for Interracial Justice
Author: David Phillips Hansen
Publsiher: Chalice Press
Total Pages: 160
Release: 2017-01-03
Genre: Religion
ISBN 13: 082722530X

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The Native American drive for self-governance is the most important civil rights struggle of our time - a struggle too often covered up. In Native Americans, The Mainline Church, and the Quest for Interracial Justice, David Phillips Hansen lays out the church's role in helping America heal its bleeding wounds of systemic oppression. While many believe the United States is a melting pot for all cultures, Hansen asserts the longest war in human history is the one Anglo-Christians have waged on Native Americans. Using faith as a weapon against the darkness of injustice, this book will change the way you view how we must solve the pressing problems of racism, poverty, environmental degradation, and violence, and it will remind you that faith can be the leaven of justice..

American Indians at Risk [2 volumes]

American Indians at Risk [2 volumes]
Author: Jeffrey Ian Ross Ph.D.
Publsiher: ABC-CLIO
Total Pages: 811
Release: 2013-10-28
Genre: Social Science
ISBN 13: 0313397651

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This essential reference work enables a deeper understanding of contemporary challenges in the lives of American Indians and Alaskan Natives today, carefully reviewing their unique problems and proposing potential solutions. • Provides a current and comprehensive analysis of contemporary problems facing American Indians • Documents the challenges of American Indians, identifies how they are qualitatively different from those of other minority groups in the United States, and presents potential solutions • Evaluates the effectiveness of both proposed and implemented solutions to problems in American Indian culture • Written by experts on American Indian affairs, including many who have lived, worked, and taught in Indian country, and are American Indians themselves.

Voices of the American Indian Experience

Voices of the American Indian Experience
Author: James E. Seelye
Publsiher: ABC-CLIO
Total Pages: 823
Release: 2013
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 031338116X

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Presents a history of Native Americans from the people themselves, from creation stories to Indians who met the first Europeans in America to accounts of those who served in the military during recent conflicts..

Lost Worlds of 1863

Lost Worlds of 1863
Author: W. Dirk Raat
Publsiher: John Wiley & Sons
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2021-12-16
Genre: History
ISBN 13: 1119777631

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A comparative history of the relocation and removal of indigenous societies in the Greater American Southwest during the mid-nineteenth century Lost Worlds of 1863: Relocation and Removal of American Indians in the Central Rockies and the Greater Southwest offers a unique comparative narrative approach to the diaspora experiences of the Apaches, O’odham and Yaqui in Arizona and Sonora, the Navajo and Yavapai in Arizona, the Shoshone of Utah, the Utes of Colorado, the Northern Paiutes of Nevada and California, and other indigenous communities in the region. Focusing on the events of the year 1863, W. Dirk Raat provides an in-depth examination of the mid-nineteenth century genocide and devastation of the American Indian. Addressing the loss of both the identity and the sacred landscape of indigenous peoples, the author compares various kinds of relocation between different indigenous groups ranging from the removal and assimilation policies of the United States government regarding the Navajo and Paiute people, to the outright massacre and extermination of the Bear River Shoshone. The book is organized around detailed individual case studies that include extensive histories of the pre-contact, Spanish, and Mexican worlds that created the context for the pivotal events of 1863. This important volume: Narrates the history of Indian communities such as the Yavapai, Apache, O'odham, and Navajo both before and after 1863 Addresses how the American Indian has been able to survive genocide, and in some cases thrive in the present day Discusses topics including Indian slavery and Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, the Yaqui deportation, Apache prisoners of war, and Great Basin tribal politics Explores Indian ceremonial rites and belief systems to illustrate the relationship between sacred landscapes and personal identity Features sub-chapters on topics such as the Hopi-Navajo land controversy and Native American boarding schools Includes numerous maps and illustrations, contextualizing the content for readers Lost Worlds of 1863: Relocation and Removal of American Indians in the Central Rockies and the Greater Southwest is essential reading for academics, students, and general readers with interest in Western history, Native American history, and the history of Indian-White relations in the United States and Mexico..

Unreconciled

Unreconciled
Author: Andrea Smith
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2019-12-13
Genre: Religion
ISBN 13: 1478007036

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In the 1990s, many evangelical Christian organizations and church leaders began to acknowledge their long history of racism and launched efforts at becoming more inclusive of people of color. While much of this racial reconciliation movement has not directly confronted systemic racism's structural causes, there exists a smaller countermovement within evangelicalism, primarily led by women of color who are actively engaged in antiracism and social justice struggles. In Unreconciled Andrea Smith examines these movements through a critical ethnic studies lens, evaluating the varying degrees to which evangelical communities that were founded on white supremacy have addressed racism. Drawing on evangelical publications, sermons, and organization statements, as well as ethnographic fieldwork and participation in evangelical events, Smith shows how evangelicalism is largely unable to effectively challenge white supremacy due to its reliance upon discourses of whiteness. At the same time, the work of progressive evangelical women of color not only demonstrates that evangelical Christianity can be an unexpected place in which to find theoretical critique and social justice organizing but also shows how critical ethnic studies' interventions can be applied broadly across political and religious divides outside the academy..